The greatest mistake

“The greatest mistake you can make in life is to be continually fearing you will make one.”
Elbert Hubbart
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Appreciate yourself!

Well … honestly spoken … I appreciate myself. Not always. But again and again. And I admit to enjoying it.

I appreciate myself for minor and major  achievements. Every time something worked as planned. Every time I kept milestones and budget … or even overachieved. Then, I am as pleased as Punch, deeply proud of myself, and I inwardly tell myself: “Well done, Christian!”

No, I do not miss appreciation by others. Most of the time I have been very fortunate having fellows and leaders, who acknowledged and esteemed my contribution … and myself. Hence, I always felt privileged. I never took it as granted, and I know that many others have to go without appreciation by others.

But especially then it is even more important to honor yourself, to self-appreciate your performance. For me, the joy about my own success goes along with self-respect; the value I give myself.

Frankly spoken, for quite a long time I thought that it would be absolutely common being pleased about own successes. A natural element of intrinsic motivation. Praise has been proven to be the best motivator. By praising myself I motivate myself. And that is how it also always felt for me. And over the years it carried me through various difficult situations.

Meanwhile I have learned that self-appreciation is by far common and generally understood. From time to time I meet people having a serious problem with appreciating themselves, appreciating their own performance.

But I think we agree that most successes are earned through hard work and are not to be taken as granted. For that reason, it should be well justified being proud of any single success. Not the narcissistic,  foppish type of self-praise … but the well-deserved inward self-appreciation for a real performance. No pride which is exaggerating the own person. But joy because you successfully delivered.

If I do not appreciate myself and my achievements … why should others do?

Don’t forget to gaggle!

post20130301zur deutschen VersionWisdom out of life for (working) life:

Once there was a countrywoman and her three chickens. While the three chickens were laying their eggs into the same shared nest, the countrywoman found only two new eggs in the nest every day.

So, she started to watch her hens. And after a while evidence seemed to be clear:

Every day always the same two chicken left the nest gaggling loudly. The third one, also always the same, quietly stole off.

So, the countrywoman quickly came to an inevitable  decision … and the modest chicken ended up in the stockpot.

But, from the next day on – to her very surprise – there was just one egg in the nest every day!

Now, what are the conclusions of this story:

  1. Some gaggle loudly even without having performed and achieved.
  2. Achieving without gaggling can kill!

 (translation from German, unknown author)